#WorthFightingFor: environmental short films Hunting Giants and Water Warriors

March 29, 2018
Djavad Mowafaghian Theatre, SFU Woodward’s Location: 149 West Hastings

On March 29th, Reel Causes and Wilderness Committee are pleased to present #WorthFightingFor, an evening of film and conversation to raise awareness about the value and fragility of our environment. Hunting Giants and Water Warriors address issues from Canada’s west and east coasts, showing how individuals and communities are coming together to save and protect the only planet we have. Nuuca, set in North Dakota, reveals important truths beyond the impact of oil on the land It’s all #WorthFightingFor.

A thrill-seeking explorer wants to find and climb the biggest tree in Canada outside a logging community on the brink of collapse. Set in the formerly prosperous town of Port Renfrew, Hunting Giants is told through the point-of-view of the residents, the local indigenous community, and a group of big tree climbers. Hunting Giants is a cinematic adventure into the old-growth rainforests of British Columbia that asks a question faced by resource communities around the world: extract profit until nothing remains or risk everything in pursuit of a more sustainable future? Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful fight to protect their water from the oil and natural gas industry. In 2013, Texas-based SWN Resources arrived in New Brunswick, Canada to explore for natural gas. The region is known for its forestry, farming and fishing industries, which are both commercial and small-scale subsistence operations that rural communities depend on. In response, a multicultural group of unlikely warriors–including members of the Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white, English-speaking families–set up a series of road blockades, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province. Water Warriors invites audiences to contemplate and re-imagine their own possibilities for resistance. Over the last decade, an oil boom in North Dakota has seen the state’s population double with primarily male workers flocking to the region. 
With this dramatic increase, has come an influx of drugs, crime and sexual violence. On the Fort Berthold Indian reservation alone, rates of sexual violence have increased 168%, with Indigenous women most affected. Juxtaposing the ravaged yet starkly beautiful landscape with personal testimony from young Indigenous women living on the reservation, Nuuca 
is an evocative mediation revealing the connections between the rape of the earth and the violence perpetrated against Indigenous women and girls. Screening followed by a Q&A with filmmakers and environmental activists.

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Wilderness Committee, founded in 1980, is a registered non-profit society with charitable status. The Wilderness Committee is Canada’s people-powered, citizen-funded wilderness protection group. They have more than 60,000 supporters, volunteers and activists from coast to coast to coast working together to preserve wilderness, protect wildlife, defend parks, safeguard public resources and fight for a stable and healthy climate. Among its many initiatives, The Wilderness Committee has surveyed and cleared wilderness trails (a unique campaign strategy) in imminently threatened wilderness areas, including Meares Island, the Stein Valley, Carmanah Valley, the Boise Valley, Clayoquot Valley, Flores Island and the Stoltmann Wilderness. These trails have kept logging at bay while providing access for scientists, photographers and wilderness activists. In a unique effort to help train and educate youth in trail building and eco-tourism, the Wilderness Committee partnered with Ahousaht First Nations in a Youth Services Canada-funded project to survey and build an 11 km long hiking route, the Ahousaht Wild Side Heritage Trail.

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Reel Causes partners with filmmakers and Canadian causes dedicated to addressing global social justice issues. We host film screenings followed by a Q&A session to educate and inspire our community, and provide a forum for authentic conversation around the issues that affect us locally.